They call her Nebraska Jones
You can never be overdressed or overeducated. (Oscar Wilde)




Eve | 22 | German | in love with books and music, photography and language | aspiring to be happy | bibliophile | British at heart | quite short

Let's have dinner.
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This. Now. Ok bye.

This. Now. Ok bye.









amantedelcalcio:

twerkin—with—satan:

itsstuckyinmyhead:

The Sims Tumblr Posts

reblogging for ” Nigga We Gon Learn Shapes ‘





leonkumquat:

when my dad was in college he had a friend who told a girl he’d take her on a date unlike any other she’d ever been on and so he took her to the supermarket to watch the lobsters fighting in the lobster tank

they’re married now





backgrouncl:

girl, are you from tennessee?
cuz youre the only ten i see….
on the pH SCALE YOU A BASIC BITCH













the-last-teabender:

jexxer:

The Doctor in a nutshell.

The show in a nutshell.





voidbat:

hautecoutureoverdose:

”Venus” dress by Christian Dior, 1949
Gray silk net embroidered with feather-shaped opalescent sequins, rhinestones, simulated pearls, and paillettes.
This extraordinary ball gown by Christian Dior, of foggy gray silk tulle, arrayed with an overlay of scallop-shaped petals, is called “Venus.” The bodice and shell forms of its skirt are embellished with nacreous paillettes and sequins, iridescent seed beads, aurora-borealis crystals, and pearls. The glittering overskirt and train adumbrate both the seashell motif and the crescent wave patterns of Botticelli’s Venus. Dior is best known for his revival of the wasp-waisted silhouette seen here. His celebrated first collection of 1947 was dubbed the “New Look” by the influential American editor Carmel Snow, because the corseted, full-bosomed, and hourglass shaping had not been seen for decades. In fact, the “New Look” was an old look revived. After the deprivations of World War II, Dior believed that the survival of the haute couture relied on its ability to restore fantasy and luxury to women’s wardrobes. The fragile effects of this gown, which merges Second Empire romanticism with the classical iconography of ideal and eternal beauty, recall Dior’s belief that “fashion comes from a dream.”


::gasp::

voidbat:

hautecoutureoverdose:

”Venus” dress by Christian Dior, 1949

Gray silk net embroidered with feather-shaped opalescent sequins, rhinestones, simulated pearls, and paillettes.

This extraordinary ball gown by Christian Dior, of foggy gray silk tulle, arrayed with an overlay of scallop-shaped petals, is called “Venus.” The bodice and shell forms of its skirt are embellished with nacreous paillettes and sequins, iridescent seed beads, aurora-borealis crystals, and pearls. The glittering overskirt and train adumbrate both the seashell motif and the crescent wave patterns of Botticelli’s Venus. Dior is best known for his revival of the wasp-waisted silhouette seen here. His celebrated first collection of 1947 was dubbed the “New Look” by the influential American editor Carmel Snow, because the corseted, full-bosomed, and hourglass shaping had not been seen for decades. In fact, the “New Look” was an old look revived. After the deprivations of World War II, Dior believed that the survival of the haute couture relied on its ability to restore fantasy and luxury to women’s wardrobes. The fragile effects of this gown, which merges Second Empire romanticism with the classical iconography of ideal and eternal beauty, recall Dior’s belief that “fashion comes from a dream.”

::gasp::





sliceofbri:

spoken-not-written:

am i the only one who thinks people look hotter when they’re in underwear and not when they’re naked

1) its this whole “leaving it to the imagination” thing that we humans like
2) genitals are fuckin weird lookin bro
3) have you seen a limp dick it’s like a sad sea creature

















epic-humor:

copy and paste yourself into my bed